Gorillas’ Intelligence

Gorillas are calm, reserved and patient. They are less adaptable and curious than chimpanzees and they don’t show the same inclination to imitate.

After chimpanzees, Gorillas comes second with a brain weight of approximately 500 g. However, brain size alone is not a reliable indicator of the animal’s mental abilities. If the relationship between brain and body weight is considered, the gorilla comes last in a comparison with the other apes and humans.Mountain Gorilla in The Jungle

It’s believed that Gorillas are capable of recognizing them selves among others. If a group member cross to another group – the other members can identify if found.

Gorillas are capable of using tools like sticks, stones among others during their day to day life. Gorillas can use sticks to scoop termites from the ant hills. If Gorillas sense a trap, they can use a stick to prove. They can also throw stones to the enemy.

Gorillas are capable of forming a family known as troops led by a mature male known as silverback. The head of the family is assigned to command the family.

Gorillas are capable of using sign language through verbal and non verbal communication. The silverback can beat the chest which implies authority.

Gorilla are calm if not attacked – they are served and patient. Gorillas can not attack you unless you show signs of attacking them – they do it for defense.

Young Gorillas pay respect to the elders in the group – that is why family of gorillas is led by the mature males called silverback.

Gorilla mothers suckle their off springs to the level of maturity – a level at which they can feed on vegetation. Infants suckle at least once per hour and sleep with their mothers in the same nest.

The mother Gorillas train their young ones how to feed, climb, run, and jump among others – it’s done to prepare young ones for the future challenges.

Baby Gorillas are safely guarded by the elders – the group does not move far away from where young ones are laid. If the baby cries – the mother rushes to rescue.

In case of death, Gorillas mourn to show their sadness for the loss of the members. This is also common among human beings.

Like human beings, Younger males subordinate to the silverback, known as black backs, may serve as backup protection.

Females form strong relationships with males to gain mating opportunities and protection from predators and infanticidal outside males.

Females may fight for social access to males and a male may intervene. Females will purse their lips and slowly approach a male while making eye contact. This serves to urge the male to mount her. If the male does not respond, then she will try to attract his attention by reaching towards him or slapping the ground.

Male gorillas are not active in caring for the young, but they do play a role in socialising them to other youngsters.

In human growth and development – boys at the age of 18 year are assigned to leave the parents’ family to forms their families and infants gorilla begin to break contact with their mothers after five months, but only for a brief period each time. By 12 months old, infants move up to five meters (16.4 ft) from their mothers. At around 18–21 months, the distance between mother and offspring increases and they regularly spend time away from each other.

Gorillas can laugh, grieve, have “rich emotional lives”, develop strong family bonds, make and use tools, and think about the past and future like the other great apes, gorillas can laugh, grieve, have “rich emotional lives”, and develop strong family bonds.

Gorillas make and use tools, and think about the past and future Like the other great apes, gorillas can laugh, grieve, have “rich emotional lives”, develop strong family bonds, make and use tools, and think about the past and future.

About the Author: Mathias is a senior tour consultant from African Jungle Adventures, specialists in gorilla trekking safaris in Rwanda (Volcanoes National Park) and Uganda (Bwindi Impenetrable Forest and Mgahinga National Park). More of his writings can be found on  http://www.rwandasafarigorilla.com/blog.html